Monthly Archives: April 2011

Stories and People


While trying to get a group together to hang out this evening I realized something. No matter what the story is about, people generally want to know. To get together and learn or experience something. Maybe the whole point of mythology is just to bring people together. To have a group and a community. After all, isn’t that just what things like church do? Bring peope with some common denominator together? Just a thought.

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Mistletoe


Websites I got my info from: http://www.goddessgift.com/pandora’s_box/mistletoe.htm

“Mistletoe’s association with peace and good will is so strong that once, if enemies met under a tree that by chance had mistletoe, they were required to lay down their arms and declare a truce until the following day.  The strongest connection between mistletoe and the Yule season comes from Norse mythology. Frigga (also known as Freya) was the goddess of beauty, love, and marriage. Wife of the powerful Norse god Odin, Frigga was a sky goddess, responsible for weaving the clouds, and therefore responsible for rain and for thunderstorms.”

“Her sacred animal was the goose, and in her Germanic incarnation as the goddess Holda or Bertha, she was the original Mother Goose (causing it to snow when she shook out her bedding). Sitting at her spinning wheel weaving the fates, she was also a goddess of divination and credited with the creation of runes…more precisely she was a ‘seer’, one who knew the future but could never change it or reveal it to others.Frigga was the mother of Baldur (Balder), the best-loved of all the Norse gods. And she foresaw his death. Knowing that there was nothing she could do to avert his fate, the hapless goddess extracted a promise from all things that they would play no part in his death. Unfortunately, thinking the mistletoe was too insignificant to bother with, she neglected to secure its pledge.”

“And when the malevolent prankster Loki discovered her oversight, he crafted a dart made of the poisonous plant. Devious and evil, he brought it to Baldur’s brother who was blind, suggesting a game of darts and agreeing to guide his hand. And this he did, directing the dart directly at Baldur’s heart. The mistletoe’s white berries were formed from Frigga’s tears of mourning. Some versions of the story of  Baldur’s death end happily. Baldur is restored to life, and the goddess Frigga is so grateful that she reverses the reputation of the baleful plant, making it a symbol of peace and love and promising a kiss to all who pass under it.”

Interesting huh?

The Gods Remaining After Ragnarok


I’ve always wondered why the gods that are left after the “end of the world” were the ones chosen to survive.

Lif and Leifthrasir are the two humans left – Life and yearning for Life. Those cannot truly die so they continue on to repopulate the earth. That makes sense.

Mjollnir, Thor’s hammer, also remains. It is thunder and lightning so it should survive to bring those to the new world.

The daughter of the sun also survives and lights the new world. That’s fairly obviously important.

Baldr is the god of beauty, fertility, light and peace. These are all qualities that should be desired in a new and better world.

Vidar is the god of silence, strength and justice. These are also desirable qualities for a new world.

Vali is associated with justice and death. Death is a necessary part of life, therefore it shouldn’t cease to exist.

Modi and Magni are the sons of Thor and save Mjollnir. They are “Anger” and “Strength.” The two of them together embody the late Thor’s qualities. This is important because Thor was a very central figure in the religion and mythology.

Hodr is the blind god of poetry. Poetry was widely valued in Norse culture surprisingly. The runes and writing were often considered magical or could bring luck – whether good or bad.

Matter is Eternal


Pretty straight forward right? Most people who’ve ever taken a science class know about the law of conservation of matter: Matter is neither produced nor destroyed. I found it very interesting that this is an idea in the Norse Edda – after all, it well predates most science period, much less the law of conservation of matter. But matter doesn’t just die out or come into being like it does in much of mythology. There’s an overarching idea of eternity that is reassuring and rather appealing.

Pomegranates


Similarly to apples, pomegranates also seem to show up quite a bit – at least in Greco-Roman myth. Persephone is trapped in the underworld by 6 seeds of one and the castrated phallus of the hermaphrodite became a pomegranate tree and impregnated a girl. They always seem to be connected to sex in some way. After all, they are made from the blood from a penis as it landed on earth and have the ability to impregnate. The story of Persephone is full of sexual innuendo as well – it is considered her rape after all. Sex with Hades bound her to the underworld – is it possible that the pomegranate seeds are simply a metaphor? It’s also very convenient that the most common form that pomegranates are eaten in is seeds – which aid in conception after all. Maybe that’s why pomegranates are considered an aphrodisiac…

Apples


I’ve noticed that apples play a significant part in mythology. Particularly in Christianity and Norse myth. They represent knowledge and death and sex and immortality and eternal youth. Why apples and not some other fruit? Wouldn’t oranges or bananas work just as well? or olives? Are apples just widespread? Honestly I have no idea. But it does color my perception of apples quite a lot. Often when I eat an apple I’ve taken from the food hall for a midday snack I wonder if it tastes as good as the one Adam and Eve partook in or the ones the Norse gods ate to remain young. I like to think they help revive and rejuvenate me – almost as if I wasn’t getting any older.

Hermes Herald Staff


Some pictures of the Herald Staff: